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Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Taxpayers received about $659 million in refunds during fiscal year 2023, representing a 2.7 percent increase in the amount of refunded to taxpayers in the previous fiscal year.


The IRS announced that final regulations related to required minimum distributions (RMDs) under Code Sec. 401(a)(9) will apply no earlier than the 2025 distribution calendar year. In addition, the IRS has provided transition relief for 2024 for certain distributions made to designated beneficiaries under the 10-year rule. The transition relief extends similar relief granted in 2021, 2022, and 2023.


The IRS, in connection with other agencies, have issued final rules amending the definition of "short term, limited duration insurance" (STLDI), and adding a notice requirement to fixed indemnity excepted benefits coverage, in an effort to better distinguish the two from comprehensive coverage.


The Tax Court has ruled against the IRS's denial of a conservation easement deduction by declaring a Treasury regulation to be invalid under the enactment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


For purposes of the energy investment credit, the IRS released 2024 application and allocation procedures for the environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation under the low-income communities bonus credit program. Many of the procedures reiterate the rules in Reg. §1.48(e)-1 and Rev. Proc. 2023-27, but some special rules are also provided.


The IRS has provided a limited waiver of the addition to tax under Code Sec. 6655 for underpayments of estimated income tax related to application of the corporate alternative minimum tax (CAMT), as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169).


The IRS has issued proposed regulations that would provide guidance on the application of the new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock made after December 31, 2022 (NPRM REG-115710-22). Another set of proposed rules would provide guidance on the procedure and administration for the excise tax (NPRM REG-118499-23).


If you use your car for business purposes, you may have learned that keeping track and properly logging the variety of expenses you incur for tax purposes is not always easy. Practically speaking, how often and how you choose to track expenses associated with the business use of your car depends on your personality; whether you are a meticulous note-taker or you simply abhor recordkeeping. However, by taking a few minutes each day in your car to log your expenses, you may be able to write-off a larger percentage of your business-related automobile costs.

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Under the so-called "kiddie tax," a minor under the age of 19 (or a student under the age of 24) who has certain unearned income exceeding a threshold amount will have the excess taxed at his or her parents' highest marginal tax rate. The "kiddie tax" is intended to prevent parents from sheltering income through their children.

If you own a vacation home, you may be considering whether renting the property for some of the time could come with big tax breaks. More and more vacation homeowners are renting their property. But while renting your vacation home can help defray costs and provide certain tax benefits, it also may raise some complex tax issues.

The benefits of owning a vacation home can go beyond rest and relaxation. Understanding the special rules related to the tax treatment of vacation homes can not only help you with your tax planning, but may also help you plan your vacation.